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Welcome

Welcome to the Bach48 project website! This is a place to explore the multifaceted aspects of the Bach48 Album and its many components. You will find information about the project and its people, about the Well-Tempered Clavier, and about J.S. Bach. Here you will also find the latest news about the album, the music, the films, and our next events.

It is our intention with this project to be creatively engaged across disciplines with Bach and the Well-Tempered Clavier as central themes. Beyond the release date of the main album we wish to keep the conversation going with its audience long into the future. We therefore encourage you to leave your contact information or follow us on our social media pages and to check back here regularly to see what is new.

We also encourage children to visit and learn about Bach and participate in our project, in the dedicated ‘Kids’ section. Finally, for those who wish to know more, our Journal and our Bach Resource are rife with information, with new content regularly added. 

Enjoy listening, watching, and exploring all aspects of this project. Thank you for visiting!

 

If you love what we are doing, please help us do more of it!

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Album

The Bach48 Album: Voyage into the Well-Tempered Clavier

A documentary and an audio/video recording produced by the International Beethoven Project – Released on Orchid Classics & distributed by Naxos

Martin Mirabel & Mariano Nante, film directors
Harms Achtergarde, audio producer
George Lepauw, piano

You can order the physical album or stream it.

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Premium Content

Film trailer

News

Matthew Trusler & George Lepauw: The Double Interview

Matthew Trusler & George Lepauw: The Double Interview

Journal News
Orchid Classics record label founder Matthew Trusler had some questions he wanted to ask George. And George had some in...
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Benedetta Saglietti interviews George Lepauw

Benedetta Saglietti interviews George Lepauw

Journal News
Music scholar Benedetta Saglietti interviews George Lepauw about the Bach48 Album   Read this article in Italian by clicking here....
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The 48 Days of Bach48: A musical countdown to release day

The 48 Days of Bach48: A musical countdown to release day

News
Each day beginning December 28th and through February 14th, for a total of 48 days, we will post a new...
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6 months ago

Bach48

In honor of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, and to express the awe and love we hold for our Blue Planet, we are happy to share with you this first work from the visual “Bach:Source” project which is inspired by the meaning of the name Bach = River. A collaboration between visual artist Céline Oms and George Lepauw, this project will illustrate all 96 pieces of the Well-Tempered Clavier with scenes of nature and water. As Beethoven (may have) said, “his name shouldn’t be River [Bach] but Ocean”... May we all learn to see the beauty of our world and tend to it lovingly.
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#earthday #blueplanet #milkyway #overvieweffect #nature #ecology #environment #water #ocean #atlantic #river #stream #art #visualart #video #photography #naturephotography #bach #welltemperedclavier #climate #climateaction #climateart #sky #h2o #oxygen #elements #infinity #beauty #music #piano
Céline Oms Photographe George Lepauw
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7 months ago

Bach48

New review of the Bach48 Album in BBC Music Magazine
(Nouvelle critique de l'album Bach48, en français ci-dessous)

PERFORMANCE ✭✭✭✭
RECORDING ✭✭✭✭✭

Don't forget to get your copy or listen on streaming!

In short: George Lepauw provides the listener with a thoughtful if at times idiosyncratic survey of these preludes and fugues; [his] journey through these wonderful pieces is contemplative, commendably articulate and enhanced by unfailing linear clarity. His use of the sustaining pedal is judicious, and his carefully controlled rhythmic elasticity emphasizes the romance of Bach’s music. In summary, there is much to enjoy in this imaginatively presented set.

Full article:
What Schumann memorably dubbed ‘the work of all works’ has long attracted harpsichordists and pianists in equal measure. Though Bach himself could have barely envisaged the Steinway piano of today - the chosen instrument for this recording - it seems unlikely, from all that we know of his active interest in the evolution of keyboard instruments, that he would have considered it unsuitable for the ‘48’.

George Lepauw provides the listener with a thoughtful if at times idiosyncratic survey of these preludes and fugues; and who of us can but applaud the sentiments expressed in his accompanying essay that the recording ‘was born out of my desire to become a more complete musician, and a better human being.’ Lepauw’s journey through these wonderful pieces is contemplative, commendably articulate and enhanced by unfailing linear clarity. His use of the sustaining pedal is judicious, and his carefully controlled rhythmic elasticity emphasizes the romance of Bach’s music.

Inevitably, listeners will encounter their own highs and lows. The playful, virtuosic C sharp major Prelude (Book I) lacks the singing, at times almost puckish character of Edwin Fischer, while the E flat minor Fugues (Book I), affectingly used in Ingmar Bergman’s film Wild Strawberries, as well as providing inspiration for a proposed Bauhaus style Bach monument in 1928, is sustained with acute sensibility. In Book II the D minor Prelude felt too brisk whereas, by contrast, the D major Prelude, almost a sonata movement, is full of interest, and whose chordal quavers in the second bar - and wherever the pattern occurs thereafter - are rhythmically gently swung. In summary, there is much to enjoy in this imaginatively presented set.

Nicholas Anderson

EN FRANCAIS :

Version raccourcie : George Lepauw fournit à l’auditeur un parcours réfléchi, bien que parfois idiosyncratique, de ces préludes et fugues ; Le périple de M. Lepauw à travers ces merveilleux morceaux est contemplatif, louablement articulé et renforcé par une clarté linéaire sans faille. Son utilisation de la pédale est judicieuse, et son élasticité rythmique soigneusement contrôlée souligne la romance de la musique de Bach. En résumé, il y a beaucoup à apprécier dans cet ensemble imaginativement présenté.

Version complète :

PERFORMANCE ✭✭✭✭
ENREGISTREMENT ✭✭✭✭✭

Ce que Schumann a mémorablement cité comme ‘l’œuvre de toute les œuvres’ a longtemps attiré les clavecinistes et pianistes en égale mesure. Quoique Bach lui-même n’aurait pas vraiment pu imaginer le piano Steinway d’aujourd’hui - l’instrument choisi pour cet enregistrement - il semble improbable, de tout ce que l’on sait de sa grande curiosité pour l’évolution des instruments à clavier, qu’il aurait considéré ce piano inadapté aux ‘48’.

George Lepauw fournit à l’auditeur un parcours réfléchi, bien que parfois idiosyncratique, de ces préludes et fugues ; et qui de nous ne peut qu’applaudir les sentiments exprimés dans son essai accompagnant ce coffret, que ‘cet enregistrement est né du désir que j’avais de devenir un musicien plus complet, ainsi qu’un meilleur être humain.’ Le périple de M. Lepauw à travers ces merveilleux morceaux est contemplatif, louablement articulé et renforcé par une clarté linéaire sans faille. Son utilisation de la pédale est judicieuse, et son élasticité rythmique soigneusement contrôlée souligne la romance de la musique de Bach.

Inévitablement, les auditeurs rencontreront leur propres hauts et bas. L’espiègle et virtuose prélude en do dièse majeur (Livre I) manque le chantant, et parfois presque malicieux caractère d’Edwin Fischer, tandis que la fugue en mi bémol mineur (Livre I), affectueusement utilisée dans le film ‘Fraises Sauvages’ d’Ingmar Bergman, ainsi que fournissant l’inspiration pour un monument de Bach proposé dans le style Bauhaus en 1928, est soutenu avec une sensibilité aiguë. Le prélude en ré mineur du Livre II semble trop rapide tandis que, en contraste, le prélude en ré majeur, presque un mouvement de sonate, est plein d’intérêt, et dont les croches pointées de la deuxième mesure - et partout où ce modèle se retrouve après - sont doucement balancées rythmiquement. En résumé, il y a beaucoup à apprécier dans cet ensemble imaginativement présenté.

Nicholas Anderson
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7 months ago

Bach48

#bach335 : The 335th Bach Birthday Challenge!

March 21-March 31
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Participate for a chance to win a complete box set of the new Bach48 Album! 3 winners will be selected randomly on April 1! The goal is to use Bach’s music to engender lots more expressive creativity to honor the great composer on his birthday!
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^^^^^^^^ Rules: ^^^^^^^

1) pick your art form (dance/movement, music, drawing/painting, photo/film, circus, poetry, etc.). Kids welcome! Pros and amateurs welcome!

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2) Pick a track of your choice from the Bach48 Album (available on all streaming services - look up George Lepauw). Listen to it. Feel it.

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3) use the track to make your art, then post the result on your social media account(s) with the track number and, if it’s filmed in any way, try to make the music audible in your film if possible. If it’s a music remix, take it in any direction you’d like to.

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4) use #bach335 and tag @bach48album and/or @georgelepauw

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5) tag two friends of yours who are likely to play along to this project

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#dancebach #drawbach #paintbach #bachart #bach48 #bach #bachbirthday #notjustbeethoven #improvisation #piano #fugue #movement #flow #nature #music #birthday
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8 months ago

Bach48

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